General Hobby Brag Thread (Image Heavy)

From gardening and needlework to Mornington Crescent and captioneering.
Valheru
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Post by Valheru » Sun Apr 27, 2014 5:34 am

Very impressive.

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Val
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Post by Val » Thu Oct 16, 2014 8:57 am

I maked a pictar for calendars my company is printing for our clients.

The filigree shit on the sides I ripped off the internet. The rest I illustrated myself. CorelDraw and Corel PhotoPaint X6.

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mattsidedish
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Post by mattsidedish » Fri Oct 17, 2014 12:25 am

By profession, I'm a commercial fisherman, sportfishing captain, yacht service mechanic, fish house worker, and also a reel mechanic. I service, repair, modify, and restore fishing reels, new and old, big and small. I've done thousands probably by now, and I have tons and tons of pictures, but here's just a couple.

A Penn International 30 ii-speed before:
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Same reel after:
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The same reel completely broken down:
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A vintage Abu Garcia baitcaster before:
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After:
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A typical service consists of completely disassembling the reel, cleaning each part by hand with a solvent, drying, then adding fresh grease. When you take these apart though, you have to reset the drag systems to match up to the standard load ratings from the manufacturer. This alone can take an hour per reel. A typical service (not including drag calibration) usually takes about two hours and costs anywhere from $40 to $150, depending on the order. It started out as a fun hobby for me and my friends, then turned into wuite a lucrative business for me.
"In a child's power to master the multiplication table, there is more sanctity than in all your shouted amen's and holy holy's and hosanna's. An idea is a greater monument than a cathedral. And the advance of man's knowledge is a greater miracle than "all the sticks turn to snakes" and the parting of the waters."

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Jobar
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Post by Jobar » Fri Oct 17, 2014 1:15 am

Interesting!

When I have to do greasy and dirty mechanical work like that- today I was working on a wheel bearing- I wear disposable thin vinyl gloves, sometimes two layers. It keeps you from damaging your skin with solvents, and still lets you keep your sense of touch. Looks like you have some on, in that first picture.

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mattsidedish
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Post by mattsidedish » Fri Oct 17, 2014 1:19 am

I still wear them when I use muriatic acid for etching anodized metal and such, or methalyne chloride for removing epoxy (in other jobs), but otherwise I have hand skin like the pad on a camel's knees.

Really, the grease and solvents I use aren't that bad. Occasionally I'll use some degreaser made by CRC that comes in an aerosol can; that stuff is nasty. Feels freezing cold like carb/choke cleaner on your skin.
"In a child's power to master the multiplication table, there is more sanctity than in all your shouted amen's and holy holy's and hosanna's. An idea is a greater monument than a cathedral. And the advance of man's knowledge is a greater miracle than "all the sticks turn to snakes" and the parting of the waters."

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ceptimus
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Post by ceptimus » Sun Nov 08, 2015 11:58 am

I'm learning to fly a quadcopter (model drone) "FPV": it stands for 'first person view' - there is a little video camera on board that transmits live video back to the ground. You wear video goggles while flying so it's almost as though you're riding on the model.

This was a week ago.

(Not loaded: eQaNXcv60EE)
(View video on YouTube)

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Roo St. Gallus
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Post by Roo St. Gallus » Mon Nov 09, 2015 1:18 am

[quote=""ceptimus""]I'm learning to fly a quadcopter (model drone) "FPV": it stands for 'first person view' - there is a little video camera on board that transmits live video back to the ground. You wear video goggles while flying so it's almost as though you're riding on the model.

This was a week ago.
[/quote]

That is way cool.

So, how much elevation do they allow before they start demanding registration and restriction? Is there a distinction between 'toy' and 'tool'? Potential abuse seems inevitable...
IF YOU'RE NOT OUTRAGED, YOU'RE NOT PAYING ATTENTION!

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ceptimus
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Post by ceptimus » Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:54 am

So far, in the UK, we can operate them under pretty much the same rules as for any other radio control model:
  • No more than 400 ft high
  • No more than 1/2 km away
  • Must always be in line of sight of the pilot
  • No flying over people, buildings, etc.
  • Must have permission of the land owner
Additionally for these FPV things, you're supposed to have a spotter stand next to you so that if the video link fails the spotter can point out where the model is (or can take over the flight). The spotter rule is usually ignored for the practical reason that after the first two or three flights the spotters becomes so bored that they no longer bother to watch the models - so if the video link fails the spotter has less idea where the model is than the guy that was flying it with the goggles does.

There are plenty of idiots flying drones who have no model flying background and no appreciation of the risks involved so that is a worry.

As usual it only takes one or two morons to ruin it for everyone - sooner or later some fool will crash one of these models in the centre of London, say, or use one to take photographs of a princess in her garden or similar - and then we can expect the politicians to ban them or bring in some unworkable registration and licensing scheme.

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Jobar
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Post by Jobar » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:59 pm

Way cool, sure enough!

Looks like one potential problem would be hitting one of the birds (rooks?) that were all over the place when you first flew over the pasture.

I'm intrigued by the two large depressions in that field. Obviously man made, and maybe quite ancient. Do you know anything about those?

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Old Woman in Purple
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Post by Old Woman in Purple » Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:07 am

First quilt I ever made, back in the late 1970s, when I was in my teens. "Basket Weave"

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Last edited by Old Woman in Purple on Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:18 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Old Woman in Purple
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Post by Old Woman in Purple » Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:08 am

Quilt #32, "Confetti" made for my daughter.

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Old Woman in Purple
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Post by Old Woman in Purple » Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:15 am

Quilt #10, Scrappy Roman Stripe, made for my sister.

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Old Woman in Purple
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Post by Old Woman in Purple » Tue Nov 17, 2015 5:17 am

Quilt #42, Stars & Wheels, made for my husband (a diehard Cubs fan)

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Grendel
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Post by Grendel » Tue Nov 17, 2015 8:06 am

Well done. :notworthy:

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Val
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Post by Val » Tue Nov 17, 2015 10:17 am

Yo Greg, did you buy that little Taig mill?

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Grendel
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Post by Grendel » Tue Nov 17, 2015 8:41 pm

[quote=""R. Soul""]Yo Greg, did you buy that little Taig mill?[/quote]

No ... a bigger one here

Countdown

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Aupmanyav
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Post by Aupmanyav » Wed Nov 18, 2015 2:15 am

delete
'Sarve khalu idam Brahma'
All things here are Brahman (physical energy).

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Val
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Post by Val » Wed Nov 18, 2015 4:18 am

[quote=""Grendel""]
R. Soul;616438 wrote:Yo Greg, did you buy that little Taig mill?
No ... a bigger one here

Countdown[/QUOTE]

Nice little machine! Are those the standard acccessories? Impressive.

How are the tolerances? Build quality?

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Grendel
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Post by Grendel » Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:09 am

[quote=""R. Soul""]
Grendel;616495 wrote:
R. Soul;616438 wrote:Yo Greg, did you buy that little Taig mill?
No ... a bigger one here

Countdown
Nice little machine! Are those the standard acccessories? Impressive.

How are the tolerances? Build quality?[/QUOTE]

I already own a Sieg Lathe (C3) which is Chinese ... despite ..if you keep the dovetails tight this is a great little lathe.

So the Mill is an Optimum ... German and German labelled ... but still it's really a Chinese under german specs. So far haven't had the chance to use it because I my benchs are supported off the wall of the workshop (Sea Container) and they aren't strong enough to hold it. It's around 200kg all up.

So I retire in 12 days. I am buying another 20' sea container and am dedicating that to the workshop. Until then the Mill is still in wraps.

My problem is I don't want anything touching the floor of the container. Like the old one below, which is going to be my storeroom. This is so I can fabricate large frames etc on the floor.

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The problem is this that I now have the Mill (200kg) and the Surface Plate (300kg) and they need to be beside each other and hanging off the wall.

I have worked out a way to use 50mmx50mm box tube as columns, And a 50mm x 50mm shelf supports coming off the columns at 90deg (horizontal to the columns. (box tube wall thickness 6mm)

Because I don't want to use brackets extending down or up at 45deg I am going to internally brace the butt joint .... I hope it works. 1/2 tonne in your lap would be no fun heheeee.

Don't know if the drawing below is understandable. Picture tham as a box tube column with a horizontal box-tube being welded to it. But not a standard butt weld. In effect I am transferring the down-bending-angular-moment to a tensile force on the T-bar, and distributing what would be a straight butt-weld to the curved dove-tail projection. I will heat the t-bar to lengthen it, and then while still hot weld it to the back where it projects out the back of the column. As it cools and shrinks it will transfer tremendous upward force to the rear of the column, countering the down-bending moment on the join.

Does all that make sense ?

Tomorrow I will go and pick out my sea container. I prefer to pick my own rather than just have one delivered.

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Hope it works.

PS: The mill never came with any accessories, I bought them all. I am ordering end-mill bits from the states. The whole deal so far has cost 2800AUD. The end mill bits are another 200AUD.

I posted the wrong mill table,mine is lockable and tilt-able from 0-90deg, which I need. I couldn't afford a sine-table .. so I have an old WWI artillery inclinometer, can measure degrees and minutes of arc, just as good as a sine table or sine vice but more difficult to set up. Still a good sine table is around 800 bucks here ... so the artillery sight will just have to serve instead.

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Last edited by Grendel on Wed Nov 18, 2015 6:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Val
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Post by Val » Wed Nov 18, 2015 7:07 am

The t-bar will eventually stretch. Why don't you just make a sturdy frame for it to stand on, using castors for moving it around and fat bolts you can screw downwards for taking up the weight when you want to work (i.e they will lift the castors off the ground.)

I'm intrigued why you don't want anything touching the floor.

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Grendel
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Post by Grendel » Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:12 am

[quote=""R. Soul""]The t-bar will eventually stretch. Why don't you just make a sturdy frame for it to stand on, using castors for moving it around and fat bolts you can screw downwards for taking up the weight when you want to work (i.e they will lift the castors off the ground.)

I'm intrigued why you don't want anything touching the floor.[/quote]

I do like your idea of the castors, but it ain't so practical for me. I wish it was.

I have a large property, but no flat space whatsoever. My house is the green spot and the land goes up and over the summit. There is no flat space. For the house and track I had to use a bulldozer.

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The house only has storage for household stuff. My one container is both store (mower, shovels, fencing wire, all that shit) as well as the workshop. Just to get the little Bush-Pig out I have to back over the edge of a ravine.

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So if I am building a gate or anything large the only flat welding space I have is the floor of the container. I use the floor for laying, marking out, welding, cutting etc. If all the benches had legs etc, I wouldn't be able to use the floor.

Apart from that I'm a neat-freak.

I don't think the T-bar will stretch (25mm re-bar). The dovetail joints on either side of the box-tube will be fully welded just as tho the box-tube was butt-welded, the T-bar is just a safety feature should the welds crack. The T-bar will prevent any sudden collapse. There will be four columns along the wall for the Mill and Plate. Thats only 125kg for each column and the walls of each column are 6mm x 2. (12mm) Each one will have the dovetail and the T-bar. I haven't done any engineering calcs, I'm just over engineering it from the start. The horizontals only project out 600mm.

Anyway, thats what I'm hoping. Any engineer on here is welcome to tell me the bending moment on 4 x 600mm horizontals supported on one end only and carrying 500kg.

:d unno: :confused:

I'm hoping I'm well over the safety margin limit.

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Val
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Post by Val » Wed Nov 18, 2015 12:09 pm

Here's what I'd do based on what I'm seeing in the pics. It looks like you have enough relatively flat(ish) ground there. Space the containers apart so that a third one (or more) could fit between. Throw a concrete floor between the two and cover up the back and top with IBR. Make a set of hinged doors so you have a wee garage between the two containers. That will give you plenty of welding/storage space for peanuts.

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Post by Siempre » Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:13 pm

I like the quilts. I bought a home made one WAY back. It is falling apart on me now from using it so often. It is probably something you should use primarily for decoration, but I just like using it when laying around, like in front of the fireplace, etc. Not something I could ever make myself though... not enough patience.

My main hobbies are traveling around and shooting photos. I also play pool.

One hobby I'm thinking of taking up is metal detecting for whenever I travel around. Might encourage me to stop at more places and stuff. I don't really expect to find any treasures... lol. It would be more like how some people fish and release. Just for leisure. Though, if I dig something good up it's going in my pocket, not back on the ground. :D :d igging:

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Grendel
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Post by Grendel » Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:27 pm

[quote=""R. Soul""]Here's what I'd do based on what I'm seeing in the pics. It looks like you have enough relatively flat(ish) ground there. Space the containers apart so that a third one (or more) could fit between. Throw a concrete floor between the two and cover up the back and top with IBR. Make a set of hinged doors so you have a wee garage between the two containers. That will give you plenty of welding/storage space for peanuts.[/quote]

I hope I'm not boring you shitless. But you have asked.

No vehicle, except the little pig, can get to that side of the 'flat' anymore. The house divides the flat in two. The container on that side is stranded.

Also, when you are a long way from no where you just can't ring for a cement truck ... heheee ... and that's an awful lot of cement, gravel and sand, which also would have to be delivered, to mix by hand.

But most important, I am not always up there. So I have to lock up what I have because it all on it's own in the bush.

OK Dude ... your turn. Some pics of your workshop/setup. I'm interested.

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Val
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Post by Val » Thu Nov 19, 2015 3:16 am

I have a double garage and a granny flat stacked to the rafters with datsun bits. Nothing to see, really.

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