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Old 12 Aug 2017, 07:48 PM   #675662 / #226
Roo St. Gallus
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Hmmm...



I'm not as familiar with the Short civil Empire flying boats as I am with the Pan Am experience with Sikorsky, Martin and Boeing. It looks like I should do some reading on Imperial Airways. And the Short brothers' venture. Roe & Saunders were in to making flying boats, too, weren't they?

&


These look like just the pair for some winter reading.
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Old 13 Aug 2017, 04:23 PM   #675686 / #227
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Whoop....I've attracted attention. I'm now getting Icon A-5 ads in my feed.



Hmmm...They look like updated Republic Seebees.

And, it looks like Vickers is trying to get in to this market with their Wave:



But wait...There's more!
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Old 13 Aug 2017, 09:50 PM   #675690 / #228
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Originally Posted by Roo St. Gallus View Post
Whoop....I've attracted attention. I'm now getting Icon A-5 ads in my feed.



Hmmm...They look like updated Republic Seebees.

And, it looks like Vickers is trying to get in to this market with their Wave:



But wait...There's more!
The VP of engineering at Icon is a friend of mine. I can probably get you a discount.
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Old 13 Aug 2017, 11:24 PM   #675693 / #229
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The VP of engineering at Icon is a friend of mine. I can probably get you a discount.
Cool beans.

I'm gonna guess that this is well out of my paltry budget, even with a 'discount'. (One of their videos shows a 'potential customer' recommending an Icon A-5 instead of 'just another Maserati in the garage'.)

So, since you've a friend in neck deep, can I assume you've had a spin in one?

I would think that they would offer a real boat-barn-storming opportunity. I'd pay for a ride.

Last edited by Roo St. Gallus; 13 Aug 2017 at 11:35 PM.
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Old 14 Aug 2017, 01:27 AM   #675695 / #230
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Okay, aviation buffs...

The Short Mayo Composite, 1938.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wiki
...Mercury separated from her carrier at 8 pm to continue what was to become the first commercial[note 1] non-stop East-to-West transatlantic flight by a heavier-than-air machine. This initial journey took 20 hrs 21 min at an average ground speed of 144 mph (232 km/h).[11]
The pair in Ireland.

The Maia-Mercury composite continued in use with Imperial Airways, including Mercury flying to Alexandria, Egypt, in December 1938. After modifications to extend Mercury's range, it established a record flight for a seaplane of 6,045 miles (9,726.4 km) from Dundee in Scotland to Alexander Bay, in South Africa between 6 and 8 October 1938.

Only one example of the Short-Mayo composite was built, the S.21 Maia with the registration G-ADHK and the S.20 Mercury G-ADHJ...
Only one example of the composite was constructed and was used the first time to accomplish the first ever east to west heaver-than-air flight from Foyle to Montreal. Then it goes on to talk about how it was repeatedly used.

So...If there is only one and it launches in air to allow the four-engine floatplane to make it to North America, what does the floatplane do once it is in North America? It cannot make the distance without the lift, and it requires the special lift, of which there is only one, and it is in Europe. How does this work? What am I missing? How does the specially launched floatplane return?
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Old 14 Aug 2017, 02:10 AM   #675698 / #231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worldtraveller View Post
The VP of engineering at Icon is a friend of mine. I can probably get you a discount.
Cool beans.

I'm gonna guess that this is well out of my paltry budget, even with a 'discount'. (One of their videos shows a 'potential customer' recommending an Icon A-5 instead of 'just another Maserati in the garage'.)

So, since you've a friend in neck deep, can I assume you've had a spin in one?

I would think that they would offer a real boat-barn-storming opportunity. I'd pay for a ride.
Have not had a chance to see one in person yet. One of the things I haven't done yet, aviation wise, is fly in a float/seaplane. It'll happen eventually, though.
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Old 14 Aug 2017, 02:11 AM   #675699 / #232
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Originally Posted by Roo St. Gallus View Post
Okay, aviation buffs...

The Short Mayo Composite, 1938.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wiki
...Mercury separated from her carrier at 8 pm to continue what was to become the first commercial[note 1] non-stop East-to-West transatlantic flight by a heavier-than-air machine. This initial journey took 20 hrs 21 min at an average ground speed of 144 mph (232 km/h).[11]
The pair in Ireland.

The Maia-Mercury composite continued in use with Imperial Airways, including Mercury flying to Alexandria, Egypt, in December 1938. After modifications to extend Mercury's range, it established a record flight for a seaplane of 6,045 miles (9,726.4 km) from Dundee in Scotland to Alexander Bay, in South Africa between 6 and 8 October 1938.

Only one example of the Short-Mayo composite was built, the S.21 Maia with the registration G-ADHK and the S.20 Mercury G-ADHJ...
Only one example of the composite was constructed and was used the first time to accomplish the first ever east to west heaver-than-air flight from Foyle to Montreal. Then it goes on to talk about how it was repeatedly used.

So...If there is only one and it launches in air to allow the four-engine floatplane to make it to North America, what does the floatplane do once it is in North America? It cannot make the distance without the lift, and it requires the special lift, of which there is only one, and it is in Europe. How does this work? What am I missing? How does the specially launched floatplane return?
I would assume they'd have to have the launch/assist planes stationed in places around the world?

Missed the part about there being only one built. Fuck if I know.

Maybe they took a different route back, with refueling stops or something. I'd have to see if I can find some more information on the history and see how it actually operated.
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Old 14 Aug 2017, 02:56 AM   #675703 / #233
Roo St. Gallus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roo St. Gallus View Post
Okay, aviation buffs...

The Short Mayo Composite, 1938.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wiki
...Mercury separated from her carrier at 8 pm to continue what was to become the first commercial[note 1] non-stop East-to-West transatlantic flight by a heavier-than-air machine. This initial journey took 20 hrs 21 min at an average ground speed of 144 mph (232 km/h).[11]
The pair in Ireland.

The Maia-Mercury composite continued in use with Imperial Airways, including Mercury flying to Alexandria, Egypt, in December 1938. After modifications to extend Mercury's range, it established a record flight for a seaplane of 6,045 miles (9,726.4 km) from Dundee in Scotland to Alexander Bay, in South Africa between 6 and 8 October 1938.

Only one example of the Short-Mayo composite was built, the S.21 Maia with the registration G-ADHK and the S.20 Mercury G-ADHJ...
Only one example of the composite was constructed and was used the first time to accomplish the first ever east to west heaver-than-air flight from Foyle to Montreal. Then it goes on to talk about how it was repeatedly used.

So...If there is only one and it launches in air to allow the four-engine floatplane to make it to North America, what does the floatplane do once it is in North America? It cannot make the distance without the lift, and it requires the special lift, of which there is only one, and it is in Europe. How does this work? What am I missing? How does the specially launched floatplane return?
I would assume they'd have to have the launch/assist planes stationed in places around the world?

Missed the part about there being only one built. Fuck if I know.

Maybe they took a different route back, with refueling stops or something. I'd have to see if I can find some more information on the history and see how it actually operated.
Heh...Yeah, I was reading along thinking it was an inspired approach, considering that the Short Empire could not cross the Atlantic...I even looked up the late 1930s Flight articles about the composite. Lots of golly-gee-whiz stuff about the composite connection and lift of the composite, but even in those, nobody mentions what happens to the launched craft once it reaches its destination with no launch craft at the other end. I'm guessing that the craft had to take the 'Atlantic Bridge' route, through Gander and Reykjavik, home.
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Old 14 Aug 2017, 03:05 AM   #675704 / #234
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roo St. Gallus View Post
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Originally Posted by Worldtraveller View Post
The VP of engineering at Icon is a friend of mine. I can probably get you a discount.
Cool beans.

I'm gonna guess that this is well out of my paltry budget, even with a 'discount'. (One of their videos shows a 'potential customer' recommending an Icon A-5 instead of 'just another Maserati in the garage'.)

So, since you've a friend in neck deep, can I assume you've had a spin in one?

I would think that they would offer a real boat-barn-storming opportunity. I'd pay for a ride.
Have not had a chance to see one in person yet. One of the things I haven't done yet, aviation wise, is fly in a float/seaplane. It'll happen eventually, though.
I'm intrigued that it is a seaplane that you can fold up and park in your double garage (if you have one).

Likewise on the seaplane. I'd love to do an actual flying boat, but I suspect it will more likely be on a DHC craft on floats (Beaver, Otter, or Twin Otter) out of Victoria Harbour.

I had a flight booked through Northwest Seaplanes to do a 'wine tour' off Lake Chelan, where they fly you in to the wine tasting and fly you back out (Beaver or Otter), but that was quashed by an importune property lien collection by a local government agency. I could rebook for the 'wine flight', but last summer, after I was supposed to have flown in, the immediate area had a nasty forest fire. An extensive one, too. I don't imagine that this soon after a fire that the forested countryside is going to be as fetching as it had. [ETA: Evidently, they lost their mooring lease on the lake and are not operating there in 2017.]

Last edited by Roo St. Gallus; 14 Aug 2017 at 04:00 AM.
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