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Old 27 Jul 2017, 07:01 PM   #675120 / #376
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France and the UK are aiming to stop allowing the sale of internal combustion "vehicles" after 2040.

I wonder if that definition includes farm equipment, 18-wheelers, locomotives, and aircraft.

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/s...064138951.html
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Old 27 Jul 2017, 08:15 PM   #675124 / #377
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Originally Posted by Tubby View Post
France and the UK are aiming to stop allowing the sale of internal combustion "vehicles" after 2040.

I wonder if that definition includes farm equipment, 18-wheelers, locomotives, and aircraft.

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/s...064138951.html
Mr Van Beurden assured investors that its advance into low-carbon electricity would be “deliberately capped at a moderate pace”.

“I’m sure we will make mistakes, but I don’t want them to be big mistakes,” he said.


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Old 01 Aug 2017, 09:49 PM   #675240 / #378
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Default seaweed farms

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... The seaweed could be converted to biochar to produce energy and the char pelletised and discarded overboard. Char, having a mineralised carbon structure, is likely to last well on the seafloor. Likewise, shells and any encrusting organisms could be sunk as a carbon store...
https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/0...-the-fish.html
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Old 05 Aug 2017, 07:17 AM   #675343 / #379
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IKEA Teams With LG Chem As Storage Battery Prices Plunge | CleanTechnica -- welcome to see that piece of the puzzle falling into place.

Scientists produce robust catalyst to split water into hydrogen, oxygen noting Bifunctional metal phosphide FeMnP films from single source metal organic chemical vapor deposition for efficient overall water splitting - ScienceDirect
Quote:
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen to produce clean energy can be simplified with a single catalyst developed by scientists at Rice University and the University of Houston.

The electrolytic film produced at Rice and tested at Houston is a three-layer structure of nickel, graphene and a compound of iron, manganese and phosphorus. The foamy nickel gives the film a large surface, the conductive graphene protects the nickel from degrading and the metal phosphide carries out the reaction.
This material is designed to be used in both electrodes for electrolysis, the splitting of water with electricity. The cathode (- electrode) makes hydrogen, and the anode (+ electrode) makes oxygen.
Quote:
"The standard for hydrogen evolution is platinum," Whitmire said. "We're using Earth-abundant materials—iron, manganese and phosphorus—as opposed to noble metals that are much more expensive."

The new catalyst also requires less energy, Whitmire said. "If you want to make hydrogen and oxygen, you have to put in energy, and the more you put in, the less commercially viable it is," he said. "You want to do it at the minimum amount of energy possible. That's a benefit of our material: The overpotential (the amount of energy required to trigger electrocatalysis) is small, and quite competitive with other materials. The lower you can get it, the closer you come to making it as efficient as possible for water splitting."
This will be good for renewable energy, since it offers an alternative storage mechanism. With excess electricity, electrolyze water and store the resulting hydrogen. Then when the wind or the Sun are unavailable, combine the hydrogen with oxygen to make water again, like in a fuel cell.

Hydrogen will also be useful as a starting material for synthetic fuels (synfuels). Extract carbon dioxide from the air and combine it with hydrogen. One can produce a wide range of fuels in this fashion, and also chemical-factory raw materials.
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Old 05 Aug 2017, 08:20 PM   #675351 / #380
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That's really cool. If we could distribute generation across the globe using small hydrogen fuel cells coupled with solar and wind, the system would be a lot more robust.
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Old 27 Sep 2017, 10:51 PM   #677288 / #381
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I'd have to see a diagram to have any understanding of this, but someone claims

bacteria + evaporation ----> curling motion ----> mechanical energy transfer ----> electricity generation.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/energy-so...115410328.html

I'll classify it as one of those "out there" ideas which is fun to dream about, but not likely to come into significant use.
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Old 25 Nov 2017, 11:06 AM   #681051 / #382
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Future Of Food: Reinventing The Burger | CleanTechnica -- seems rather oddly out-of-place, except for the theme of having a low resource footprint.

These companies make vegetarian fake meat:
Impossible Foods
Beyond Meat

The Impossible Foods burger gets its flavor and color with the help of heme, the source of the red color of red blood and red meat. Heme is a porphyrin ring with an iron ion in its center. Reading the IF site gives no hint as to where IF gets its heme from.

My first thought was that IF gets their heme by cheating, by using cow blood. But I found the answer here: Silicon Valley's Bloody Plant Burger Smells, Tastes And Sizzles Like Meat : The Salt : NPR They decided to use leghemoglobin as its source, a hemoglobin-like protein that legumes have in their roots. But extracting it directly from plant roots is impractical, so they transferred the leghemoglobin-protein gene to yeast, and they grow this yeast in vats. It makes this protein, and it gets heme attached to it, so that's how IF gets its heme.

-

Another fake-meat food is Quorn, made from fungus mycelium, a mat of fungus strands. It is fed glucose, and that is made by fermenting starch. So it's still something like farm animals. But if the fungus can be fed simpler organic compounds like methanol or ethanol, then one can make its feedstocks using synthetic-fuel processes from renewable sources, thus completely bypassing organism photosynthesis.
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Old 25 Nov 2017, 11:17 AM   #681052 / #383
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Combining Solar Panels With Agriculture Makes Land More Productive | CleanTechnica
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According to a Fraunhofer press release, the experiment involves 720 bi-facial solar panels covering about a third of a hectare of agricultural land (on the Demeter farm cooperative Heggelbach). The panels are mounted high enough to allow the crops planted below to receive almost as much sunshine as they would if the panels were not there and to permit farm machinery to operate beneath them. After a year of trials, the research showed the dual use system increased the total productivity of the land by 60%.

Fraunhofer refers to the dual use system as “agrophotovoltaics,” or APV. “APV has the potential to open up new space that is urgently needed for the PV expansion in Germany, says professor Hans-Martin Henning, the director of Fraunhofer ISE. “At the same time, APV can mitigate the conflicting interests between agriculture and open space PV systems for viable land. Before market readiness, however, other sectors and differently sized systems still must be tested. Also, the technical integration must be further advanced, for example, the implementation of storage.”
So as long as plenty of light gets through, the plants can grow. In fact, crop plants' growth can be limited by other factors, like water, temperature, and soil nutrients.
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Old 25 Nov 2017, 11:31 AM   #681053 / #384
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The ITC Cliff: Will Solar Be Economically Viable Without the ITC? - Renewable Energy World That's the 30% Investment Tax Credit for installing solar-energy systems.
Quote:
The residential and commercial solar ITC has helped annual solar installation grow by over 1,600 percent since the ITC was implemented in 2006, which represents a compound annual growth rate of 76 percent. According to the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA), solar installations increased 30 percent in 2014, thanks partly to cheaper photovoltaic panels. Solar proponents note that the solar industry employs more than twice as many U.S. workers as coal mining and has added jobs 20 times faster than the rest of the economy. Additionally, approximately 27 GW of solar energy were installed in the U.S. in 2015 with installations expected to reach nearly 100 GW by the end of 2020.

The 30 percent ITC is paying dividends for the U.S. Solar is growing faster than any other domestic energy source as prices continue to plummet, even beating out coal and cheap natural gas in some markets. The solar industry created one in 78 of our country’s new jobs last year while providing living-wage salaries for more than 200,000 Americans.

Moreover, the roughly 210,000 Americans currently employed in solar is expected to double to 420,000 in the same time period, all this while spurring roughly $140 billion in economic activity. The continued success of the ITC demonstrates that stable, long-term federal tax incentives can drive economic growth while reducing prices and creating jobs in one of the fastest-growing industries in the U.S.

Many supporters say the abrupt end date of the 30 percent credit represents a “cliff” for the industry. Without the current incentive, they argue, installation of solar-power systems will plummet, and thousands of jobs in the industry will be lost as a result. However, others argue that the “cliff” isn’t as steep as it appears, and that solar will continue to grow even without the 30 percent credit—albeit not as quickly as before.
So it will be a big bump in the road, and nobody is sure how big it will be.

Proposed Tax Reform Bill Has ‘Disastrous Implications’ for Renewable Energy - Renewable Energy World -- also for wind energy
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Old 25 Nov 2017, 01:37 PM   #681055 / #385
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Following a crisis when a series of tornados brought down 49 electricity towers and three major lines a few months ago, which blacked out the entire state for several hours and parts of it for up to ten days, Elon Musk offered the South Australian government to build a 100 megawatt battery within 100 days of signing the contract. If he could not meet the deadline it would be finished for free. Yesterday it was tested ahead of schedule and it will be connected to the grid on the first of December. It will be charged by a nearby wind farm in times of low demand and serve as a top up at peak demand times.

The capacity can power 30,000 homes for a bit over an hour, which does not seem like a lot, but the benefit is much amplified by the fact that the existing electricity generators in Australia, most of which were sold to the private sector by various conservative state governments, charge several times the ordinary rate when demand is at its peak. "It'll be cheaper because private enterprise is more efficient" they said. I for one was not surprised when prices skyrocketed after the various handovers.

Per contract the South Australian government has dibs at a fixed, close to off-peak price on the entire capacity of the battery, which is the biggest battery in the world, for now anyway.

In 2003 South Australia had a total of 0.5 megawatts worth of wind generators. Today it has 1.5 gigawatts. 32+% of the state's electricity needs are met by them. There are well over a dozen more wind farms under construction or in the planning and design stages. With increased storage capability there will be less need to use local gas and electricity from the neighbouring state of Victoria, which produces it using the dirtiest of all sources - brown coal - for the base.
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Old 25 Nov 2017, 05:10 PM   #681065 / #386
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The Big Embrace: Electric Utilities Accept Wind and Solar as Reliable Sources, Plan for the Long Haul - Renewable Energy World

Africa’s Solar Industry Needs More Sustainable Solutions - Renewable Energy World and Putting Solar+Storage to Work for Africa’s Farmers - Renewable Energy World -- thus bypassing fossil fuels for electricity. The Sun is also more reliable than some electricity grids there.

Orsted Green Bond Bets on the Future of the Planet - Renewable Energy World -- it was formerly DONG Energy, but it recently sold off its oil and gas production facilities. It's now named after Hans Christian Ørsted (Oersted), an early researcher into electromagnetism.

Making the Case for Peak Defection and Why Utilities Should Care - Renewable Energy World
Quote:
“Grid Defection,” a term popularized by the Rocky Mount Institute in their report Economics of Grid Defection, has caused some trepidation among utilities executives taking a long-term look at their industry. However, little has materialized to date that gives reason for major concern. Instead, we are starting to see some selective defection during certain points of the day, specifically among non-residential customers. A term for this more near-term threat might be “Peak Defection.” Driving this movement are the improving economics of large scale energy storage, more sophisticated energy management systems, and legacy tariff structures. An additional tailwind is that intermittent renewables and energy efficiency measures are further driving up peak prices in many areas of the US (EIA).
With good electricity storage, it becomes possible to buy electricity at night, store it, then use it in the daytime. One can thus lower one's electricity bills rather dramatically.
Quote:
But wait, isn’t lowering demand during peak periods a fine result for both the ratepayer and the utility? Answer: it’s not necessarily good for the utility. Utilities must build and maintain the grid to meet peak demand, not average demand. Natural gas combustion turbine peaker plants cost $700 to $1000/kW to build, even though their capacity factors are typically less than 10 percent.
So utilities may end up saddled with peaker plants that they don't get much use out of.

Subsidizing Coal, Nuclear Could Drive Customers Off-Grid - Renewable Energy World
Quote:
Within the next month, energy watchers expect the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to act on an order from Energy Secretary Rick Perry that would create new pricing rules for certain power plants that can store fuel on site to support grid resilience. This initiative seeks to protect coal-fired and nuclear power plants that are struggling to compete with cheaper energy sources.
Like natural gas, wind, and solar.
Quote:
Will consumers willingly pay higher bills to support coal and nuclear power? My research group has analyzed another option: Going off-grid and generating electricity with home-based solar energy systems. Recently we compared the cost of grid power to off-grid renewable generation in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. We found that within a few years, a majority of single-family owner-occupied households could afford the necessary generating systems and economically defect from the grid.
The possibility of grid defection has prompted some utilities to try to slow down the adoption of grid-connected rooftop solar energy by paying less for electricity that they receive from their customers and similar measures. As solar electric generation becomes cheaper, this has led to the possibility of a "death spiral" for electric utilities.

However, there will still be plenty of electricity users that cannot generate enough electricity for themselves on their rooftops. Users like people working in multistory office buildings. So there will still be a place for electric utilities.
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Old 25 Nov 2017, 06:15 PM   #681074 / #387
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermit View Post
(Elon Musk's 100-megawatt big battery ...)

The capacity can power 30,000 homes for a bit over an hour, which does not seem like a lot, but the benefit is much amplified by the fact that the existing electricity generators in Australia, most of which were sold to the private sector by various conservative state governments, charge several times the ordinary rate when demand is at its peak. "It'll be cheaper because private enterprise is more efficient" they said. I for one was not surprised when prices skyrocketed after the various handovers.
Seems like a "peaker battery", much like a "peaker plant", a generator that can be quickly revved up for peak demand. Usually a natural-gas turbine one, a sort of stationary jet engine.

But I find it welcome as a way of demonstrating how to fill a big hole in renewable-energy development: storage.
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Old 27 Nov 2017, 01:07 PM   #681193 / #388
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
The Big Embrace: Electric Utilities Accept Wind and Solar as Reliable Sources, Plan for the Long Haul - Renewable Energy World

Africa’s Solar Industry Needs More Sustainable Solutions - Renewable Energy World and Putting Solar+Storage to Work for Africa’s Farmers - Renewable Energy World -- thus bypassing fossil fuels for electricity. The Sun is also more reliable than some electricity grids there.

Orsted Green Bond Bets on the Future of the Planet - Renewable Energy World -- it was formerly DONG Energy, but it recently sold off its oil and gas production facilities. It's now named after Hans Christian Ørsted (Oersted), an early researcher into electromagnetism.

Making the Case for Peak Defection and Why Utilities Should Care - Renewable Energy World
Quote:
“Grid Defection,” a term popularized by the Rocky Mount Institute in their report Economics of Grid Defection, has caused some trepidation among utilities executives taking a long-term look at their industry. However, little has materialized to date that gives reason for major concern. Instead, we are starting to see some selective defection during certain points of the day, specifically among non-residential customers. A term for this more near-term threat might be “Peak Defection.” Driving this movement are the improving economics of large scale energy storage, more sophisticated energy management systems, and legacy tariff structures. An additional tailwind is that intermittent renewables and energy efficiency measures are further driving up peak prices in many areas of the US (EIA).
With good electricity storage, it becomes possible to buy electricity at night, store it, then use it in the daytime. One can thus lower one's electricity bills rather dramatically.
Quote:
But wait, isn’t lowering demand during peak periods a fine result for both the ratepayer and the utility? Answer: it’s not necessarily good for the utility. Utilities must build and maintain the grid to meet peak demand, not average demand. Natural gas combustion turbine peaker plants cost $700 to $1000/kW to build, even though their capacity factors are typically less than 10 percent.
So utilities may end up saddled with peaker plants that they don't get much use out of.

Subsidizing Coal, Nuclear Could Drive Customers Off-Grid - Renewable Energy World
Quote:
Within the next month, energy watchers expect the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to act on an order from Energy Secretary Rick Perry that would create new pricing rules for certain power plants that can store fuel on site to support grid resilience. This initiative seeks to protect coal-fired and nuclear power plants that are struggling to compete with cheaper energy sources.
Like natural gas, wind, and solar.
Quote:
Will consumers willingly pay higher bills to support coal and nuclear power? My research group has analyzed another option: Going off-grid and generating electricity with home-based solar energy systems. Recently we compared the cost of grid power to off-grid renewable generation in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. We found that within a few years, a majority of single-family owner-occupied households could afford the necessary generating systems and economically defect from the grid.
The possibility of grid defection has prompted some utilities to try to slow down the adoption of grid-connected rooftop solar energy by paying less for electricity that they receive from their customers and similar measures. As solar electric generation becomes cheaper, this has led to the possibility of a "death spiral" for electric utilities.

However, there will still be plenty of electricity users that cannot generate enough electricity for themselves on their rooftops. Users like people working in multistory office buildings. So there will still be a place for electric utilities.
In Arizona, there have been several lawsuits that have hopefully set a precedent for the future of solar. The electric utilities are required to 'buy back' excess solar for homes that are still connected to the grid (which is most of them) so even without off-peak batteries, those with solar power usually make enough back from the utilities that if they need to buy during peak times, it's generally a wash or better.

I personally know a couple of a people with solar on their roofs and a small wind turbine (~2kw) that on an annual basis generally pay zero to the utility, and only wind up paying maintenance on the turbine/solar panels.

If/when I ever build a home in AZ, I'd combine a solar, wind, and a 'battery wall' and probably be more or less self sufficient.
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Old 25 Dec 2017, 08:15 AM   #682333 / #389
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Germany Predicted To Set Renewable Energy Record In 2017 | CleanTechnica -- 33% of all the electricity that it consumed. The difference (coal) - (renewables) dropped from 11% to 4% in one year.
Quote:
The share of renewables among all electricity produced in Germany this year was actually closer to 36%, since Germany exports power to other European countries. The nation’s power system is “decarbonizing itself in big steps,” Kapferer says. According to his organization’s calculations, coal has fallen from 40.3% of total electric production last year to 37% this year. “The reduction of coal-fired power production is in full swing,” he told the press in Berlin recently. He added that the trend is bound to continue in coming years, as “nobody will invest in hard coal plants any longer,” due to changes in the marketplace.
Unconventional Solar Panel Siting Saves Agricultural Land While Providing Plenty Of Power | CleanTechnica -- discusses using land unsuitable for farming, like excessively salty land and rooftops. Another approach is to put the solar panels high enough above the land to avoid being intrusive.

Netherlands First To Hold Subsidy-Free Wind Power Auction | CleanTechnica -- very welcome. No word on how well it turned out, however.

The Death Of Oil: Scientists Eyeball 2X EV Battery Range | CleanTechnica -- by improving their electrodes.
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Old 25 Dec 2017, 02:53 PM   #682337 / #390
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So is coal being replaced by renewables or natural gas, like in the US? Either would reduce the raio of coal vs renewables
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Old 25 Dec 2017, 06:55 PM   #682342 / #391
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Traditional Conservatives Create New Group To Promote Renewable Energy | CleanTechnica
The Wisconsin Conservative Energy Forum
Quote:
Scott Coenen, the group’s executive director, claims the organization is not a lobbying effort. Its sole purpose is to educate Republicans that “renewable” and “clean” are not dirty words that should make right-thinking representatives of the people recoil in horror. Its mission is solely to convince Republicans who have been taught that all talk of renewables is fake news based on junk science that clean energy might actually offer some economic benefits, such as job creation and lower energy bills.

It’s been a tough sell among Stepford Republicans who march in lockstep to the tune called by the Koch Brothers. “There’s a fair amount of shoulder shrugging and general questions about it,” Coenen says. “Nobody associates renewable energy with Republicans.” But he thinks the message will resonate with younger people who will be driving the political process in coming years.
They've got their work cut out for them. Let's see if they will ever acknowledge how much that oligarchs like the Koch brothers have bought their party.

Is Elon Musk An Elitist Jerk? | CleanTechnica He objected to public transit because he has to share its vehicles with random strangers and because it is not door-to-door.

Why Do People Buy Into Republican Economic Myths? Why Do Republican Politicians Buy Into Them? | CleanTechnica -- they are good at portraying themselves as experts on economic issues.

Under Trump's Nose, US Offshore Wind Energy "Revolution" Stirs Like A Mighty Beast | CleanTechnica
The Koch brothers successfully obstructed Cape Wind, off of Cape Cod, but five wind turbines off of Rhode Island have gotten started, and there is more to come.

California Poised To Hit 50% Renewable Target A Full Decade Ahead Of Schedule | CleanTechnica -- in 2020.

Governor of Puerto Rico Promises Revenge for Republican Betrayal | CleanTechnica

Battery Researchers Keep Coming Up With New Breakthroughs | CleanTechnica

Higher Birth Weight, Lower Risk Of Premature Births After Coal Power Plant Shut Down | CleanTechnica
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Old 26 Dec 2017, 01:57 AM   #682343 / #392
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lpetrich View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermit View Post
(Elon Musk's 100-megawatt big battery ...)

The capacity can power 30,000 homes for a bit over an hour, which does not seem like a lot, but the benefit is much amplified by the fact that the existing electricity generators in Australia, most of which were sold to the private sector by various conservative state governments, charge several times the ordinary rate when demand is at its peak. "It'll be cheaper because private enterprise is more efficient" they said. I for one was not surprised when prices skyrocketed after the various handovers.
Seems like a "peaker battery", much like a "peaker plant", a generator that can be quickly revved up for peak demand. Usually a natural-gas turbine one, a sort of stationary jet engine.

But I find it welcome as a way of demonstrating how to fill a big hole in renewable-energy development: storage.
Yes, its primary purpose is to chop into peak demand periods.

Over 30% of South Australia's energy needs are met by wind turbines, even though they cannot be regarded as base generators until more storage facilities are developed.
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Old 11 Feb 2018, 01:59 AM   #683590 / #393
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Why a Big Utility Is Embracing Wind and Solar - The New York Times
Quote:
Xcel Energy is a utility company with millions of electric customers in the middle of the country, from Texas to Michigan. In booming Colorado, the company asked for proposals to construct big power plants using wind turbines and solar panels.

The bids have come in so low that the company will be able to build and operate the new plants for less money than it would have to pay just to keep running its old, coal-burning power plants.
Those bids are being helped by Federal subsidies, but they are to be phased out over the next few years. But by then, wind and solar electricity generation ought to be cheap enough not to need those subsidies to compete.

How did it happen?
Quote:
As they scale up, new technologies often follow a “learning curve” that cuts the cost. But it’s not automatic. You have to build more and more units to drive the prices down.

That happened naturally with consumer products like Model Ts and cellphones, since everybody who saw the things wanted one. But the electricity system was a hidebound, monopolistic industry that used to spend virtually nothing on innovation.
Solar Panels Do Work On Cloudy Days | CleanTechnica Typically 10 - 25%

New US Renewable Energy Capacity Beats Natural Gas For 4th Year Running, Renewables Now Account For Over 20% | CleanTechnica
Quote:
For the fourth year in a row, new US electricity capacity from renewable energy sources surpassed those from natural gas, and accounted for half of all new capacity additions, according to recent figures published by the country’s Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

New electricity capacity from renewable energy sources — including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, and wind — accounted for 49.85% of all new capacity installed during 2017, which totaled 24,614 MW (megawatts), meaning that there was 12,270 MW worth of new renewable energy capacity. New natural gas capacity accounted for 48.67%, with the remaining new capacity being served by waste heat (0.89%), nuclear (0.41%), and oil ( 0.16%). There was no new coal capacity added during 2017.

...
Over the past five years, renewable energy generating capacity has increased across the board in the United States. On top of solar’s 7.77% increase, wind energy grew by 53.88%, biomass by 11.20%, geothermal by 3.51%, and hydropower by 2.79%. In fact, the generating capacity of all non-hydro renewable energy sources is 73.89% greater than it was five years ago, and renewables together account for 20.21% of the United States’ installed generating capacity. Five years ago this figure stood at only 15.40%. Unsurprisingly, given its popularity and economic viability, wind energy stands out from the pack for the moment, accounting for 7.45% of total US generating capacity.

On the other side of the energy generating street, natural gas has only increased its share of generating capacity by 5.14% over the past five years, and oil by only 5.35%. Most importantly, however, is the state of coal, which over the past five years has seen its share of total generating capacity decline by 17.83%.
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Old 11 Feb 2018, 03:04 AM   #683592 / #394
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Bill Joy Has 65 Million Reasons Why Solid State Batteries Are The Next Big Thing | CleanTechnica
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In the tech world, Bill Joy is a superstar. He is a co-founder of Sun Microsystems. He also is a co-developer of Java and one of the early pioneers of the Internet of Things. Along the way, he became part of the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins. Bloomberg reports that Joy, together with Alliance Ventures and others, has invested $65 million in Ionic Materials, founded by Mike Zimmerman.

Ionic is focused on manufacturing a polymer it says will replace the liquid electrolyte found in today’s lithium ion batteries. On its website, it proclaims, “Our solid polymer is the first of its kind to conduct ions at room temperature. This material enables new frontiers of safety, cost and energy density for batteries.” Zimmerman says, “We’re the key ingredient to make the new battery. We’re teaching others how to use our materials.”
This material will not only be useful in lithium batteries, it will also be useful in alkaline ones, including ones with aluminum. Using more common raw materials will make them cheaper.

The solid-state electrolyte will also be better behaved, with much less risk of fire.


India Achieves 20 Gigawatts Solar Capacity 4 Years Ahead Of Initial Target | CleanTechnica

Is Coal A Patriotic Issue? | CleanTechnica -- in Poland, it apparently is.

Rooftop Solar + Storage = Hurricane Energy Resiliency | CleanTechnica
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Old 11 Feb 2018, 07:06 PM   #683607 / #395
dancer_rnb
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Hmmmm. Using a hybrid car as an emergency generator for when power goes out.
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Old 17 Feb 2018, 10:06 PM   #683760 / #396
lpetrich
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Originally Posted by dancer_rnb View Post
Hmmmm. Using a hybrid car as an emergency generator for when power goes out.
Interesting idea. I don't know how well it can be made to work, however.

HyTech Power may have solved hydrogen, one of the hardest problems in clean energy - Vox
Quote:
Seattle native Evan Johnson thinks he can change that. He thinks he’s finally figured out how to unlock a hydrogen economy.

Johnson is far from the first or only person with that goal. But after 10 years of tinkering, testing, and preparation, he has worked out a series of technologies and a practical business plan that chart a path to real commercial scale for hydrogen.
He has been working on improved electrolytic cells, improved fuel cells, and even a hydrogen injection system for diesel engines.

Back to Cleantech News.

World’s #1 Renewable Energy Installer, NextEra, Powers On With Renewables Despite Trump | CleanTechnica
Quote:
In its recently released fourth-quarter and full-year financial results, NextEra announced it commissioned a record 2.15 GW of renewables in 2017, including 1.6 GW from repowering existing projects. 2.15 GW is probably the highest renewable energy install by any company ever in a single year.

Furthermore, NextEra plans to double this rate of install in the next few years, targeting 3–4 GW per annum of new renewables installs over the 2017-2020 period (10.1-16.5 GW in total). 2.7 GW of new projects and 0.7 GW of repowering projects were added to the company’s development backlog during the year.
Solar Plus Batteries Beat Out Natural Gas In Two US Electricity Markets | CleanTechnica
Quote:
Bloomberg reports that the combination of solar power plants and grid scale battery storage is now cheaper than natural gas and utility companies all across the US are starting to notice. First Solar has recently won a contract to supply Arizona Public Service, the state’s largest utility company, with electricity during the hours of 3 pm and 8 pm when demand for electricity is highest.
Australia's First Solar Farm Co-Located With Wind Formally Opened | CleanTechnica
Powershop Australia “Stunned” By Low Prices In Solar & Wind Purchase | CleanTechnica

Hywind Scotland, World's First Floating Wind Farm, Performing Better Than Expected | CleanTechnica
Quote:
Conversely, according to Statoil, during November, December, and January, Hywind Scotland generated at an average of 65% — and has encountered hurricane Ophelia in October, Storm Caroline in early December, and waves in excess of 8.2 meters. Storm Caroline did force the farm to shut down during the worst of the winds for safety reasons, but the turbines automatically resumed operation afterwards.
US Renewables Account For 18% Of Energy Mix, Hot On The Heels Of Nuclear | CleanTechnica
100% Renewable Electricity Worldwide Is A New Cost-Effective Reality | CleanTechnica
Global Wind Installations Reach 52.5 Gigawatts In 2017, Brings Total To 539.5 Gigawatts | CleanTechnica
Australia's Largest Floating Solar Farm Live, Could Add Storage | CleanTechnica
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